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Details Personal Photography Assignment

I'm the first to admit it, I'm horrible at shooting the details.  I love shooting the big action, but am really bad at finding the small details of some event or place that would've been a cool shot.

My friend and mentor, Alan Hess, recently showed me a personal photo assignment he's undertaken as a concert photographer.  Hands.  When he shoots concerts now, he tries to take photos of the musician's hands (a few are at that link).  I've heard time and time again to do a personal photo assignment, but until I saw his gallery of that, I never thought about it too hard.  Then a few weeks later, Joe Glyda came out with a Personal Assignment class on Kelby Training

That sealed it, I figured I should try something new and fun.  So I'm doing two things, but both have to do with Details.

First, at sporting events, I'm making a sincere effort to look for the details.  The shots that aren't the big action, but definitely have to do with the event.  Here's my first attempt at my new assignment.  You can't run track without running shoes.

My second type of personal assignment is something for me.  I've started geocaching again, not just for fun, but as a way for me to get out of the house in the morning, get off my butt, and do some walking.  I'm still calling this "Details," but it's more about just being aware of what's around me that Iwouldn't necesarily take a photo of otherwise.  This one was inspired by Brian Matiash and Jacob Lucas, since I've seen them take these amazing shots in otherwise unamazing places.

This is on the way to my first cache in a really long time, "New in the 'Neigh'borhood 3", and it's some prickly thing I ran across off the side of the trail.  

So far I'm having a lot of fun with this, and it's making slow down and be more observant about what's around me.  While this is something that may not work for you, having a photography self assignment is a good way to keep photography personal.

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